List of “Illegal Immigrants” Sparks Anxiety & Forensic Investigation

SALT LAKE CITY, UT: July 13th, 2010: A letter claiming to be from the “Concerned Citizens of the United States” accompanied a list of 1,300 Utah residents that was sent to law enforcement and media outlets. What was troubling about the list of residents is that is accused those on the list of being illegal immigrants. Additionally, and more shocking, the list contained such personal information as home address, telephone number, date of birth, and due date for pregnant women.

According to a spokesperson from the governor of Utah’s office “Any release of private information of this nature, especially the depth and breadth of it, is concerning. The governor wants to be sure that a state agency wasn’t involved, and if it was, to make sure it doesn’t happen again, and to get to the bottom of who was responsible.”

A prison term of less than one year is the sentence for improper release of information from state records. However, the medical information was divulged in violation of privacy laws such as HIPAA and is a much more serious offense.

A representative from “Proyecto Latino de Utah,” an immigrant advocacy organization, stated that he believes that the list was leaked from the State Department of Workforce Services. This department collects information that other government agencies do not, including if a household member is pregnant.

The Utah Department of Technology Services has started a forensic examination to see if any state computers were used to prepare the list. Forensic examiners will look into the history on the computers for a digital trail of evidence. Additionally, the State Department of Workforce Services is conducting an extensive investigation.

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